Session Descriptions

Friday, January 29, 2021

8 - 9 a.m.

Evidence Behind the Use of Common Vitamins and Supplements (or not)
Shannon Ramsey-Jimenez, DO; Sam Houston State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

During this presentation, the speaker will discuss vitamins and supplements that patients are commonly using. In addition, the evidence behind the use of these items, as well as that they have NOT been proven to do will be reviewed. Finally, there will be discussion on the risks and benefits of their uses so that physicians can have informed discussions with their patients.

Upon completion of this presentation participants will be able to:

  • Articulate common vitamins and supplements patients take in outpatient settings
  • Analyze evidence-based data on efficacy of said vitamins and supplements
  • Review potential side effects and drug interactions of common OTC's.

9 - 10 a.m.

Mental Health During a Pandemic 
Theresa Murphy, LCSW; Methodist Family Medicine Residency Program

Mental Health is health, even in a global pandemic. Unquestionably COVID-19 has changed our individual lives and the world. Explore data on current mental health trends and ways to increase psychological flexibility and resilience for both patients and practitioners in the midst of unprecedented change.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able:

  • Analyze current mental health data and discuss changes seen since pandemic began
  • Evaluate behavioral health needs on both a macro and a micro level
  • Identify interventions to improve psychological flexibility and resilience and plan actionable next steps.  

10 - 10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15 - 11:15 a.m.

Mental Health During a Pandemic
Traci Groening-Wang, DO; Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine

In these stressful times, resiliency and optimism are vital character traits to possess as a physician more than ever. During this presentation, participants will receive practical advice and strategies for building personal resiliency to be able to impart on our patients, medical students, residents, colleagues and staff.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify causes of physician burnout and the emotional and physical complication it may impart
  • Define resilience and adaptability and why these are vital to our successful practice of medicine
  • List self-care that may be utilized to reduce stress and increase both physical and psychological quality of life.

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Updates in DVT/PE in the Urgent Care and Emergency Department Setting
Matthew Eaton, DO; UIW-SOM/Greater San Antonio Emergency

This presentation will give a synopsis that describes and discusses the pearls and pitfalls of diagnosing and treating DVT and PE in the Urgent Care and Emergency Department setting. There are many new articles describing age adjusted d-dimer cutoffs to guide ruling out and diagnosing DVT/PE. There are also new guidelines for treatment options for DVT/PE that will affect current practice.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and discuss current guidelines on ruling out and diagnosing DVT/PE
  • Discuss new age adjusted d-dimmer criteria and studies in recent literature
  • Identify and discuss current treatment options for DVT/PE.

12:15 - 1 p.m.

Lunch on Your Own

1 - 2 p.m.

Pain Management in Primary Care (Ethics/Risk Management)
Christine Vidouria, DO; Physical Medicine and Pain Associates/UIW-SOM

This presentation will describe options in traditional medications for pain such as different forms of buprenorphine in chronic pain conditions. How to adjust medications in the older populations and what medications could be used instead of traditional schedule II opioids. Their mechanisms and how to start them. Interventional options for peripheral neuralgia and osteoarthritic conditions that have, in the past, been treated with opioid medications.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Appropriate opioid management
  • Options to minimize the schedule II medications for chronic pain
  • Interventional options that treat chronic pain conditions that were traditionally treated with opioid medication

2 - 3 p.m.

Integrative Approaches to Chronic Digestive Problems
Tonya Sweezer, DO

This presentation will review factors affecting digestive health and provide specific interventions that include herbal, nutrient, dietary and mental/emotional to reduce the impact of chronic digestive disorders.

  • Integrative and functional medicine
  • Review the role of microbiome in GI health
  • Discuss dietary and lifestyle factors affecting digestive disorders
  • Incorporate effective integrative and functional medicine interventions to improve chronic digestive disease in patients.

3 - 3:15 p.m.

Break

3:15 - 4:15 p.m.

The future of value based care: How to Optimize your Practice to Increase Quality Scores, Revenue and Patient Satisfaction
David Gutierrez, MBA, MHA; Modern Medical Billing & Consultants, LLC

As businessmen and women, we have been taught that `time is money”. We determine how and what we do every day by calculating what will generate the most profit in a given time. The volume base model taught us that the more patients seen on a given date, the higher the income. We try to focus our energy and resources to limit the time a patient spends in a room. We hire scribes, train our M.A’s. to do things quickly, which increases the chance of human error. Improper/lack of documentation has been a serious problem in our current healthcare model and it could lead to audits and patient dissatisfaction. Governmental and private insurances are now focusing more on preventative measures. Their goal is to reduce patients visits to the hospital and keep them as healthy as possible by preventing and treating patients' chronic conditions. This reduces the insurances’ costs as well as the patients’. As insurances push for this movement, incentives as well as penalties are given to the providers. There are multiple value based care payment models some of the most common ones are: pay for coordination pay for performance bundle payment (episode of care payment) and shared savings program (upside and downside)Quality Payment Program/ MIPS (Medicare) All these programs have the same goal: Save money by keeping patients healthy and out of the hospitals. The question is how do insurance companies track patient care? The answer is by providing HEDIS/ Preventive Codes. HEDIS/ Preventive codes include counseling, guidance, risk factor reductions and interventions. These codes measure the quality of the service and the care provided to the members of that plan. Based on your own performance incentives or penalties are given to encourage providers to comply with these performance measures. These codes are becoming a major part of everyday healthcare practice requirements and it will become a point where providers scores will be shown to the public. Additional information on COVID-19 updates will also be provided.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the value-based care model and its requirements (HEDIS, QPP, MRA)
  • Learn ways to target and implement value-based care models in your practice without risking any financial burden or loss of income
  • Learn about new procedure and reporting codes available
  • Look into the future and how to prepare for it.

4:15 - 5:15 p.m.

The Texas Medical Board's Top 10 List (Ethics/Risk Management)
Jeff McDonald, JD and Jon Porter, JD; McDonald, Mackay, Porter & Weitz, LLP

This presentation will discuss new rules put into place by the Texas Medical Board in the past six (6) months as well as discuss various action/activities and concerns that place physicians at risk of investigation and disciplinary action by the Texas Medical Board.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the changes to regulations that may effect their practice and their professional license
  • Discuss risk management tools to lower the risk of complaint, investigation and disciplinary action
  • Discuss ethical concerns with the practice of medicine in the state of Texas.
     

Saturday, January 30, 2021

8 - 9 a.m.

COVID-19: Where We've Been, Where We Are and Where We're Going
John Midturi, DP; Baylor, Scott & White; Infectious Disease

This session will provide an overview of the current COVID-19 pandemic.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the chronology of the current COVID-19 pandemic
  • Describe current treatment options
  • Describe preventative measures.

9 - 10 a.m.

Future of Medicine  
Monte Mitchell, JD, DO

During this presentation, participants will learn about 10-20 inventions for the future of medicine from nanobots to a star trek-like tricorder.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Introduce the new advances in medicine
  • Discuss the spectrum of activity/uses for the new advances in medicine
  • Introduce the possible ways to include the new advances in medicine into the practice world

10 - 10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15 - 11:15 a.m.

The Missing Link: OMT for Women and Children
Meaghan Nelsen, DO; UNTHSC-TCOM

In this dynamic, interactive, case-based session, attendees will navigate through common outpatient clinical encounters of the female and pediatric patient. Attendees will be reminded of their osteopathic knowledge base and encouraged to reinvigorate their skills in manipulative medicine, building on a solid foundation of evidence-based literature supporting the use of OMT in a variety of patient presentations. Come and see what your patients are missing!

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify osteopathic manipulation as the missing link in your patient treatment plans
  • Apply your knowledge of common obstetric, gynecologic, and pediatric pathophysiology to an osteopathic treatment plan for your patients
  • Anticipate, prevent, and treat common complaints from the obgyn and pediatric patient in the outpatient setting using OMT as primary or adjunctive treatment.

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Obesogens: Environmental Toxicants - A Blind Spot in Treating the Global Obesity Pandemic
Shanhong Lu, PhD, MD

Obesity is a silent pandemic in parallel to the current COVID-19 pandemic. The continuous rising rate of global trend has been baffling health care professionals as well as wellness-oriented organizations and nutritionists and dietitians. The failure to recognize the main root causes of ‘steady rising’ of metabolic challenges and endocrine disruption has led to the ineffective long term benefit and success of the weight loss programs across the board, not only in midlife and aging people, but also in kids and teenagers. This one-hour seminar will uncover and bring light to this blind spot and a stepwise and scientific sustainable program will be discussed including follow up and maintenance plans.

Upon completion of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Assess environmental toxicant burdens (top 10 obesogens)
  • Teach patients how to decrease exposures
  • Jump start a detox focused weight loss via 10-day, 21-day and 90-day approach
  • Implement a life-long commitment with periodic reset through key nutritional support
  • Understand how to watch and manage detox related toxicant redistribution
  • Join a national team approach to help people with active involvement to vote the toxic products out of our lives.

12:15 - 1:15 p.m.

TOMA Business Meeting and Lunch

1:15 - 2:15 p.m.

Applying the Five Models of Osteopathic Patient Care for ENT Infections
Carol Browne, DO; UIW-SOM

This session is designed to introduce the concept of the Five Models of Osteopathic Patient Care developed by Educational Council of Osteopathic Educators (ECOP). Essentially developed as foundational approach to the osteopathic tenet of rational treatment. The five models include: Biomechanical–Structural model - Posture and motion Respiratory–Circulatory model-Movement of body fluids and critical gas exchange Neurological model- Neurological communication systems, central, peripheral, and autonomic Metabolic-Nutritional model- Cellular and organ functions such as assimilation of nutrients, excretion of wastes, metabolic processes of all types, repair of damaged tissues, protection from infections, and reproductive functions Behavioral–Biopsychosocial model-Behaviors such as sleep, exercise, healthy dietary choices, avoidance of toxic substances, and social support networking. Using the above, the attendees will be provided a tool for thinking about their patients osteopathically. Also provided, discussion, demonstration and practice of highly effective and efficient osteopathic techniques for the care of
patients with URI.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the components of the Five Models of Osteopathic Patient Care
  • Apply the Five Osteopathic Models in the care of their patients with upper respiratory infections (URI)
  • Perform effective and efficient osteopathic techniques in the treatment of patients with URI

2:15 - 3:15 p.m.

Integrative Approaches to Reducing Infections
Robert Slater, MPH, MD; UIW-SOM

Conventional approaches to preventing and treating infections have tremendously reduced the burden of disease over the last century, but vaccines and pharmaceutical antimicrobials are not yet available for a wide range of pathogens. Luckily, many other approaches, including healthy lifestyle choices, medicinal foods, supplements, and botanicals appear to be safe and potentially effective – in this session, we will explore these integrative approaches, including practical considerations in the midst of the current pandemic.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe lifestyle approaches to reduce pathogenic exposures and improve immune function
  • Identify and describe microbial foods
  • Identify and describe the anti-microbial botanicals and supplements.

3:15 - 3:30 p.m.

Break

3:30 - 4:30 p.m.

The Importance of Self Care: Preventing Professional Burnout
David Farmer, PhD, LPC, LMFT; UNTHSC, Interprofessional Education and Practice

The health professions are experiencing burnout at alarming rates. Burnout rates as high as fifty percent and above are not uncommon for physicians.  Workshop attendees will identify their current burnout status, exploring causes of burnout and strategies for management within their personal, occupational and organizational contexts. Resilience, emotional intelligence, mindfulness and psychological safety will be introduced as management strategies to help with burnout.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define burnout and identify its causes, signs and symptoms
  • Define resilience and identify resources for developing resilience
  • Apply self-care strategies and resources for preventing and managing burnout.

4:30 - 5:30 p.m.

Beyond Breathing: The Role of the Diaphragm in our Health
Lesley Schmitz, DO

The simple act of breathing has taken on renewed importance in light of COVID-19.Often the body-wide influence of optional diaphragm motion is not appreciated. The diaphragm has profound postural and multi-organ system structure: function influences. During this presentation, the speaker will review anatomic attachments of the diaphragm to the musculoskeletal system and examine these relationships with structural and biochemical implications. The physician needs a quick postural screen to be able to deduce elements that may be causing musculoskeletal pain as well as potential structure: function limitations on several body systems. Additionally, a quick screen for foot/ankle angularity and medial arch deviations will be reviewed and we'll learn how these affect overall structure.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand anatomic attachments of the diaphragm to the musculoskeletal system 
  • Understand the screening process
  • Be able to give simple exercise and potential footwear suggestions that the patient can implement without PT or orthotist intervention
  • Recognize when referral to sources may be appropriate
     

Sunday, January 31, 2021

8 - 9 a.m.

 

When Should a Clinician Retire? (Ethics/Risk Management)
Ashley Classen, DO; Trinity Pain Medicine Associates, PA

As the aging population increases, new health enhancing strategies and nutrition have made age 80 the new age 60. Physicians are practicing routinely into their 80's without much impedance.  Hospital staffs have begun to impose neurocognitive testing (in contradiction to Federal Law) which discriminates against a particular age-group of physicians simply relating to age and without taking into account all parameters of physician health. This presentation discusses current federal discrimination law and other areas which can impact individual physician livelihood and well-being.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand how to use neurocognitive testing (NCT) as a method of determining fitness for physician practice
  • Understand essential components of a late career practitioner policy, involved age-related mandatory NCT
  • Evaluate the impact on a group practice
  • Identify strategies to help maintain functional capacity in the aging process

9 - 10 a.m.

Palliative Care: It Isn't Hospice!
Martha Danhof, DO; USMD-ASIM

During this presentation, the speaker will delineate the differences and similarities of palliative care and hospice care. In addition, a review of the benefits and needs for palliative care in relation to chronic disease states will be reviewed, as well as determining which chronic illnesses can benefit from early palliative care. In addition, the benefits of early palliative care for critically ill patients will be reviewed. Finally, Advance Directives and MOST forms for defining patient's wishes will be discussed.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the differences between palliative medicine and hospice
  • Educate regarding the benefits of early palliative care in chronic diseases
  • Discuss the importance of Advance Directives and MOST forms for medical directives and transition to hospice 

10 - 10:15 a.m.

Break  

10:15 - 11:15 a.m.

Influencing Behaviors: 7 Simple Rules to Engage Patients and Facilitate Lasting Behavior Change
Edmund Tori, DO, FACP, CHT; MedStar Health

Doesn’t it bother you that large industry giants devote billions of dollars to marketing products and behaviors that you spend your entire career trying to undo? If so, Great! Because we have something they don’t have – the one-on-one connection. With small tweaks, you can dramatically increase your ability to move people and influence behavior. In this engaging talk, you will gain the strategies, simple rules and skills to engage patients to make healthful and lasting change. (And along the way, you will gain the tools to improve every relationship you have – professional and personal).

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the 7 simple rules of influence for improving relationships and communication with patients and families
  • Understand the importance of states in memory, storytelling, word choice, voice, body language and rapport.
  • Learn to utilize conscious and non-conscious influences to optimize communication around healthful behavior change.

11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Evaluation and Management Coding Changes 2021
AOIA

Session description coming soon...

12:15 - 1 p.m.

Lunch

1 - 2 p.m.

Regenerative Injection Therapy: What is the Evidence?
Daniel Clearfield, DO; Motion is Medicine Sports Medicine

This presentation will provide an overview of regenerative injection therapies (RIT), aka orthobiologics, in treating chronic injury, dysfunction, and pain. In addition, we will discuss what RIT is, the historical perspective of where it came from, the theoretical basis of how it is performed (and how it ties into Osteopathic Principles & Practice),  review the current and evolving evidence, and finally overview the anecdotal clinical experiences from my practice.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Define RIT
  • Review the theoretical basis
  • Review current evidence
  • Overview clinical experience

2 - 3 p.m.

Hormone Replacement Therapy for the Older Adult Improves Quality of Life
Donna Becker, DO; Enhancement of Life Center

This presentation will discuss hormone replacement therapy utilizing slides to demonstrate why most aging adults need hormone replacement therapy (HRT).  Laboratory results of the average healthy young adult – optimal results – not age-adjusted results, guide therapy in the aging population.  Mood for both men and women improves with hormone replacement therapy.  Progesterone helps women by providing calmness and deep restful sleep, testosterone gives both sexes increased endurance and libido, and estradiol has neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions in the brain. Virtually every system in the body benefits from restoration of hormones to a youthful level.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the benefits of hormone restoration in older adults
  • Interpret labs related to bioidentical hormones in men and women both pre and post therapy
  • Show that achievement of hormone levels seen in the younger adult helps slow or prevent some signs of aging
  • Review side effects and risks that can be safely managed following provided guidelines
  • Understand how patient labs and outcomes demonstrate the utility of hormones for cognition, musculoskeletal preservation and sexual satisfaction 

3 - 3:15 p.m.

Break

3:15 - 4:15 p.m.

Biotensegrity Consideration in the Treatment of Chronic Posterior Pelvic Girdle Pain
Brett Lockman, DO; Sierra Biotensegrity

Despite our foundation in treatment with osteopathic manipulation, chronic low back pain still debilitates many of our patients. They often get vaguely labeled with "low-back pain", lumbago, chronic sciatica, or SI joint pain with limited lasting benefit from standard treatment regimens, yet they're non-surgical. What's next? Busy clinic days combined with patients' overlapping pain patterns from multiple pain generators only confound matters and make accurate and timely diagnosis difficult. This lecture helps shed light on quicker and more accurate diagnosis, osteopathic manipulation and exercise prescription to alleviate common biotensegrity dysfunction, and explore new and effective minimally invasive options should conservative care fail.

Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Possess a better understanding of manual and interventional treatment options for chronic posterior pelvic girdle pain
  • Be able to differentiate chronic low back pain from posterior pelvic pain
  • Understand the etiology, patterns and treatment protocols for lumbar axial spine pain
  • Understand the etiology and patterns of posterior pelvic pain and the spectrum of conservative to invasive options available to them and their patients, including in-office osteopathic treatments, image-guided needle interventions, regenerative medicine, and minimally invasive surgical options for refractory cases.

4:15 p.m.

Adjourn  

 
Accreditation

The Texas Osteopathic Medical Association is accredited by the American Osteopathic Association to provide osteopathic continuing medical education for physicians. 

The Texas Osteopathic Medical Association designates this program for a maximum of 23 AOA Category 1-A credits and will report CME commensurate with the extent of the physician's participation in this activity. 

The TOMA 65th MidWinter Conference has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the AOA Council on Continuing Medical Education. Attendees can earn 1 CME credit for every 60 minutes of educational time.

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